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New Music Box: THE SPEKTRAL QUARTET GOES TO PIECES (AND ROTS)

New Music Box: THE SPEKTRAL QUARTET GOES TO PIECES (AND ROTS)

Snowpocalypse Antidote poster“Reminick’s score, and its performance Saturday night, was bracing, original, and often jaw-dropping. The first movement, “Killing the Ape,” offers a startling take on the soli/tutti vibe of a concerto grosso, as violinist Austin Wulliman and violist Armbrust each alternate between his usual instrument and a second, gamba-style instrument held between his legs. This movement makes excellent use of the ultra-slow bow speed that creates an unpitched click from individual “grains” of the bow hair. Armbrust, in particular, got his bow to click so loudly that several audience members jumped. All this was delivered beneath Lyon’s ballsy, unaffected delivery of the sung text. In terms of singing in The Ancestral Mousetrap, this is Lyon’s big jazz solo, and her earnest, amateur lounge singer vibe was appealing.”

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Chicago Sun-Times: LADY GAGA, TONY BENNETT, U2, SLEATER-KINNEY AMONG THE 2015 CHICAGO CONCERT SEASON HIGHLIGHTS

Chicago Sun-Times: LADY GAGA, TONY BENNETT, U2, SLEATER-KINNEY AMONG THE 2015 CHICAGO CONCERT SEASON HIGHLIGHTS

Sleater-Kinney_AMA.JPG“Opposites still attract. Local chamber ensemble Spektral Quartet adds to its avant-garde repertoire (including a ringtone project and live sampler packs of old-school and super modern classical works) by partnering with Pitchfork favorite Julia Holter. The electronic artist helps debut Alex Thomas’ new composition, “Behind the Wallpaper.””

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American Composers Forum: An Interview with Doyle Armbrust of Spektral Quartet

American Composers Forum: An Interview with Doyle Armbrust of Spektral Quartet

Spektral Quartet“The American Composers Forum is pleased to co-present “Behind the Wallpaper” by composer Alex Temple, performed by The Spektral Quartet and Julia Holter on February 23, 2015 as part of the Liquid Music Series in the Twin Cities. Chris Campbell, the Operations Director of the label of the American Composers Forum, innova Recordings, recently spoke with Doyle Armbrust from Spektral and asked him to share his thoughts about the mysterious and lyrical “Behind the Wallpaper” and a few other topics.

How did Spektral’s involvement in “Behind the Wallpaper” come about, and is there anything to keep in mind or listen for when we hear it February 23?

Behind the Wallpaper came about like the vast majority of our commissions do…we were keen to work with a specific composer. Alex Temple, who is based in Chicago, has an uncanny knack for uncovering the oblique, the humorous, and even the sublime through the idiom of pop musics. While she’s hip to Lachenmann and Ligeti, etc etc etc, Alex doesn’t rely on a bevy of extended techniques to create anticipation and the feeling of something new. As a performer, it’s a wondrous thing, to see a score that doesn’t look like the blueprint for the next particle accelerator, and yet has the audience (and the players) buzzing long after the show is over. That isn’t to say we don’t thrive on those kinds of pieces. It’s just that Alex has found a peculiar, devastatingly honest way of delivering music.”

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Q2 Music: 10 Imagination-Grabbing, Trailblazing Artists of 2014

Q2 Music: 10 Imagination-Grabbing, Trailblazing Artists of 2014

Spektral Quartet“One of the coolest and craziest new-music projects of the year came from Chicago’s Spektral Quartet. In March 2014, the ensemble blew up in pockets everywhere with “Mobile Miniatures” – over 45 ringtones, alarms and mobile alerts commissioned from a who’s who of outside-the-box 21st Century music makers, from Pulitzer Prize winner David Lang to onetime MacArthur fellow George Lewis to Deerhoof’s Greg Saunier and, best of all, quite a few composers from whom I’d never heard (and am glad I have now). Insanely innovative gimmick aside, it’s really good music and a brilliant, cross-discipline introduction to today’s freshest voices. My girlfriend really hates waking up to extended string techniques, though.”

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Bent Frequency hosts Spektral Quartet for dazzling concert of avant-garde music

Bent Frequency hosts Spektral Quartet for dazzling concert of avant-garde music

IMG_4483-credit-Mark-Gresham-1024x640“Spektral Quartet gave Crumb’s “Black Angels” a vivid, compelling performance. The group was an excellent complement to Bent Frequency, and the pairing of these two ensembles on a common stage will surely go down as one of the programming coups of the calendar year.”

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The Courier-News: Side Street Gallery summons Spektral Quartet

The Courier-News: Side Street Gallery summons Spektral Quartet


Side Street Studio Arts“For the next two hours, the artists of Spektral Quartet delivered one amazing performance after another, challenging our notions of what to expect from a string quartet, and pushing the boundaries of what’s musically possible.

 

Aptly named “The Sampler Pack” because of its variety, the nine-part program spanned almost 200 years of music history, and included works ranging in length from five seconds to more than ten minutes, punctuated by impromptu remarks from the musicians themselves.

 

In contemporary pieces from Philip Glass and Bernard Rands, the ensemble tightly synchronized their body language and breathing, displaying what violinist J. Austin Wulliman later described as a “group mind” that can only be formed after innumerable hours of rehearsal together. Violinist Clara Lyon, the newest member, meshed seamlessly in this, her first appearance with Spektral.”

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Chicago Classical Review: Lee Hyla receives a zealous musical tribute at Northwestern

Chicago Classical Review: Lee Hyla receives a zealous musical tribute at Northwestern

“Hyla seems to relish the fashioning of pithy titles, but the final work presented is more traditionally labeled, his String Quartet No. 4. A model for the piece seemed to be Elliott Carter’s String Quartet No. 2, with each instrument adopting distinct personalities, and alliances shifting with assent or anger. He also fleetingly conjured Bartok with a nod to a famous theme from his Concerto for Orchestra in the viola line. The Spektral Quartet gave a vivid and idiomatic reading of an engaging work that amply rewarded their considerable preparation.”

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Seen and Heard International: Pushing the South American Envelope

Seen and Heard International: Pushing the South American Envelope

Seen & Heard Logo“What distinguished this effort from others in the “classical-plus-whatever” genre is the Spektral musicians’ technical expertise. Trained at institutions as diverse as the Paris Conservatoire, University of Southern California and Northwestern University, they have tackled everything from Haydn to Brian Ferneyhough to Lee Hyla, as well as some of today’s most interesting younger composers like Hans Thomalla and Marcos Balter.”

 

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Chicago Magazine: Chicago’s New Music Scene Cuts Loose

Chicago Magazine: Chicago’s New Music Scene Cuts Loose

“One of the most popular series is run by the virtuosic string ensemble Spektral Quartet. These concerts, called Sampler Packs, intersperse single movements or short works with stage chatter over the course of an evening. In June, Spektral set up its Sampler Pack at the Hideout as a choose-your-own-adventure for the audience, with the program printed in installments on balloons. As the audience chose a piece, the musicians popped the balloon with the corresponding work written on it.”

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We get all Barbara Walters with our new violinist, Clara Lyon

We get all Barbara Walters with our new violinist, Clara Lyon

Press releases and headshots are all part of the equation when a quartet brings on a new member, but they tend to feel a bit matter-of-fact, don’t they? We know you’re going to love our new violinist’s playing, but we’d like to give you a peek into Clara’s personality and backstory before you see her on stage. With Dan Rather, Barbara Walters and Chris Farley as my unwitting mentors, I set out to ask the incisive, hard-hitting questions:

Clara Dancing

Doyle: Hi Clara, and welcome to the wonderful family of misfits that is Spektral Quartet! Let’s dive right in. New Kids on the Block, or Backstreet Boys?

Clara: Wow, starting off with a bang I see! I am delighted to say that members of both bands are coming out with a collaborative album soon, so this terrible choice is one I don’t have to make!

DA: When did you start playing the violin?

CL: Around my 3rd birthday.

DA: You come from a musical family, right?

CL: Yup – many of my family members are professional musicians, and almost all of them play something! I grew up jamming with them and having sing-alongs. Apparently, music dates back a while in our family – the earliest that I know of was my great-great grandfather’s family. He was a bass player with 13 kids, and they made up a vaudeville-style orchestra to play for movies (which were all silent at that time, of course).

DA: Do you remember when you first knew you wanted to chase this crazy career path? Keep Reading →

Announcing Our New Violinist

Announcing Our New Violinist

The Spektral Quartet is pleased to announce our newest member, violinist Clara Lyon. A musician of exceptional ability, Ms. Lyon arrives in Chicago for the start of our 2014/15 season having just completed a fellowship with Ensemble ACJW, a competitive two-year program in joint partnership between Carnegie Hall, the Juilliard School, the Weill Music Institute, and the New York Department of Education.

Clara headshot

Ms. Lyon received her Bachelor’s degree in violin performance at the Juilliard School as the student of New York Philharmonic concertmaster, Glenn Dicterow, and went on to complete both masters and doctorate degrees at SUNY Stony Brook University with teachers Soovin Kim, Philip Setzer, Pamela Frank, and Philippe Graffin. Chamber music has always been central to Clara’s artistic life, and she has worked closely with members of the Emerson, Guarneri, and Juilliard quartets. She is currently co-director of the Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Festival’s “Together in Music” program, a new community-rooted initiative that will foster musical conversation and dialogue in the town of Blue Hill, Maine.

Keep Reading →

Announcing Our 2014/15 Season: AMPLIFY

Announcing Our 2014/15 Season: AMPLIFY

2014-15 Spektral brochure cover(photo credit: Elliot Mandel)      

The Spektral Quartet leaps into the 2014/15 season ready to amplify the audience experience, its list of exceptional collaborators, and the creation of ambitious new works for string quartet. Four large-scale, bold new pieces by some of the most imaginative composers writing today are revealed throughout the year in the interactive, inviting, and inclusive way Spektral audiences have come to expect. Balancing the traditional (Beethoven, Dvořák, Webern, Haydn, Stravinsky…) with the new (Reich, Ligeti, Crumb, Rands, Cheung…), the quartet’s fifth season, AMPLIFY, promises cherished favorites and brand-new sounds aimed at the ears of the expert and the newcomer alike.

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Sampler Pack at The Hideout: Photo Blog

Sampler Pack at The Hideout: Photo Blog

We were talking before the Hideout show on Saturday and agreeing that the Fall seems like ages ago. It’s been a massive season for us, recording four albums and landing our first European concerts. Ultimately, though, it’s about our home crowd in Chicago, and our final concert of the season felt like a big hang in a living room…one that contains a stage and serves beer, anyway.

We are grateful to our friend, photographer Elliot Mandel, for covering the evening and giving us permission to share his excellent shots. Be sure to check him out on his website! Keep Reading →

Chicago Sun-Times: Classical Highlights for June

Chicago Sun-Times: Classical Highlights for June

Sun-Times logo“The daring quartet ventures to a well-known rock venue for one of its Sampler Pack concerts in which it juxtaposes radically different kinds of music, such as Georg Friedrich Haas’ “Dido” with singer-songwriter Townes Van Zandt’s “Pancho & Lefty.””

 

 

 

 

 

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Pitchfork: Mobile Miniatures

Pitchfork: Mobile Miniatures

Pitchfork“Normally my iPhone ringer is set firmly to “off,” but I recently changed it to a new piece by the esteemed composer and one-time Pulitzer finalist Augusta Read Thomas. It’s a 35-second, anxious tangle of pizzicato and odd-angled violin and cello lines called “You’re Just About to Miss Your Call!” It really captures the existential panic that its title describes.

 

Thomas’s piece was commissioned by the Spektral Quartet, an enterprising Chicago-based string ensemble that recently decided it wanted to populate the world’s iPhones with contemporary classical music. For what they’re calling the Mobile Miniatures project (“Your mobile phone is our newest concert venue”), they contacted 46 composers. For anyone who follows the world of contemporary classical, it’s an embarrassment of riches: everyone from Bang On A Can co-founder David Lang to Nico Muhly to indie figures like Deerhoof’s Greg Saunier and Julia Holter.”

To read the whole article, click here

 

Chicago Tribune: The next accordion star

Chicago Tribune: The next accordion star

chicago-tribune-logo-black“Their mission,” says Labro, referring to the Spektrals, “is to make sure to play new music and traditional repertoire from all genres. And I always wanted to show people that there is music beyond Piazzollla. … That there is life after Piazzolla.”

 

Certainly there is in “From This Point Forward,” which marks the beginning of Labro’s partnership with the Spektral Quartet, not the end. For their next recording, they plan to venture into contemporary classical music.

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The Telegraph: The new ring-tone composers

The Telegraph: The new ring-tone composers

telegraph_logo“There’s nothing so irritating as someone else’s ring-tone. First comes the jolt to one’s nerves. Then comes the thought, “You really think THAT’s amusing/good to hear?”, as a burst of One Direction or a mooing cow scrapes tinnily at one’s ears. Of course our own ring-tone is always a model of discreet wit and taste. And yet when it rings we’re always desperate to turn it off, which shows wit and taste aren’t really the issue. The ring-tone is simply beyond redemption. It’s irritation in its purest form, like cold calls or being put on hold.

 

The Spektral Quartet, a Chicago-based string quartet, begs to disagree. They think a ring-tone can be a moment of aural delight, and have commissioned 65 brand-new ring-tone-sized pieces to prove it, all available to download from the quartet’s website. They range from one second in duration to 40, and have been written by 47 American composers of all ages, races and styles.”

To read the whole article, click here

 

Chicago Classical Review: Haydn’s “Seven Last Words” finds luminous expression with Seraphic Fire and Spektral Quartet

Chicago Classical Review: Haydn’s “Seven Last Words” finds luminous expression with Seraphic Fire and Spektral Quartet

Chicago-Classical-Review logo“The Spektral Quartet performed The Seven Last Words alone in Rockefeller Chapel in March 2013, and as a resident ensemble at the University of Chicago, they know how to adjust their performance for the chapel’s acoustics. Each instrumental line, especially the sweet but steely sound of Aurelien Fort Pederzoli’s solo violin, was clear, but the overall texture had a velvet edge. In the sixth movement (“Jesus cried out: I thirst”) of the nine-movement piece, the plucked violins and violas sounded like guitars gliding through a hushed lullaby. This was religious meditation with a gentle edge rather than the sharp angles and angry undercurrent of heaven-storming fire and brimstone.”

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Huffington Post: These Game-Changing Ringtones Bring The Symphony To The Streets

Huffington Post: These Game-Changing Ringtones Bring The Symphony To The Streets

HuffPo“Think of it as public art — except that it’s on your phone.

 

Thanks to an innovative new initiative from the Chicago-based contemporary classical ensemble Spektral Quartet, cell phone users will no longer be limited to a selection of dreary, muzak-esque sound bites or blaring, regrettable Top 40 clips when it comes to choosing their ringtones.

 

Late last month, the quartet launched Mobile Miniatures, a new Kickstarter-backedproject where they commissioned over 45 different composers — including familiar names like Nico Muhly, Julia Holter, the Dirty Projectors’ Olga Bell and Pulitzer Prize winners Shulamit Ran and David Lang — to create original pieces specifically intended to serve as ringtones. The ensemble then performed and recorded the compositions, putting them up for sale on their website.”

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Miami Herald: Seraphic Fire takes on ‘The Seven Last Words of Christ’

Miami Herald: Seraphic Fire takes on ‘The Seven Last Words of Christ’

 

The-Miami-Herald-Logo“With perfectly coordinated entrances and silences, Spektral’s mature, passionate rendition had the purity and precision of a Mozart overture. This sober, forceful tone prevailed in the chorus for the remaining seven Sonatas.”

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